Paul Tito – Cardiff Blues

first_imgTAGS: Cardiff Blues LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Paul Tito getting a little worked up The Blues captain, famous for his flame red hair, took some time out to chat to Rugby World about nicknames, pre-match routines, strangling Jason Spice and being slightly fearful of life after rugby. RUGBY WORLD: So what are your captaincy traits?PAUL TITO: I just do what comes naturally. I don’t like to say too much and I share the workload, so a few of the other boys help out. The best form of leadership is delegation.RW: Does your nickname Fish come from being a good swimmer or New Zealand’s orange roughy fish?PT: The first time I meet people, I lead them on for a little bit and say it’s all because I’m a good swimmer. When I get to know them more, I tell them [about the fish]. You should feel privileged!RW: What’s your pre-match routine?PT: I spend a lot of time sleeping, then Jason Spice usually drives round to mine. A lot of the boys get there early, but I don’t like to be there any longer than I have to be. They play disco music in the changing room. When I first came over I was like, ‘Are we going to a nightclub or playing rugby?’ It took me a while to get used to, but I don’t mind it now.RW: What’s the funniest thing you’ve seen or heard on the pitch?PT: Probably me strangling Jason Spice when Taranaki played Wellington in the NPC once! He’d been annoying me the whole game so near the end I strangled him and he went purple in the face. He’s an annoying guy on the field, but he’ll have a beer with you after the game.RW: Do you have any phobias?PT: I’m scared of life after rugby. I think about it every day. I’ve got a few ideas, but haven’t made any big decisions yet. I went straight into rugby so I’ve never had a real job or done a real day’s work, so it’ll be a shock to the system.Super-strength, The Welsh-Kiwi boat race and being a massive foodieRW: What would you like to achieve outside of rugby? RW: Who’s your ideal woman?PT: Eva Longoria. I used to watch Desperate Housewives, but it’s on too late for me over here. PT: I’d like to be a good father one day. When I finish rugby, I’m also looking forward to getting into another sport. Squash I think; I back myself on a squash court so I’d like to take it up seriously.RW: If your house was on fire, what three things would you save?PT: My Taranaki rugby jersey from my 100th game, my wife, Hayley, and my flat-screen TV. It’s on the wall, but I think I’d have time to get it; I’d just yank it off.RW: If you could have one superpower, what would it be?PT: I’d like to have Tongan-Samoan strength in terms of my rugby. They’re so strong. In life, unlimited money. Then you could do what you want all the time.RW: What’s your favourite joke?PT: I don’t really have one. The biggest joke since I’ve been over here is the Welsh-Kiwi boat race. They make a big deal of it and have more players to pick from than us, but we kill them every time; it’s 3-0 to us. They blame each other, but are all quite average. Gethin Jenkins is in charge and he should look at himself before blaming anyone else.RW: Any embarrassing moments?PT: Playing Waikato in the Ranfurly Shield, I was back covering a kick and the ball had a horrible bounce, I missed it and they scored. I was pretty gutted and there was a picture in the paper of me diving to try to get the ball.RW: Stranded on a desert island, what three things would you want with you?PT: I’d definitely need food – chicken and I love a good steak. I’ve also got a South African friend in Wales so I love a good braai, too. A pillow because I love my sleep. And I’d love to have my TV there. I like Home & Away and the early X Factor shows. A few of those people need their friends to tell them they can’t sing – I’ve been told that plenty of times.last_img read more

Aviva Premiership final: an old-fashioned tear up

first_img Going down: Courtney Lawes introduces Toby Flood to the ground the last time the two sides met on March 30By Alan Dymock“AMBUSH AT the Allianz” could be a way of describing the Aviva Premiership semi-final between Northampton Saints and Saracens.That would do a disservice to Saints, though, who maintained an impressive level of defence, breakdown abuse and thumping counter-runs in order to topple the clear favourites at their own patch. Tactically they did exactly what they needed to do to win and the shell-shocked Sarries had their spot in the final snatched away.This set up an almighty clash against their nearest of Premiership rivals the Leicester Tigers this Saturday, a team who had ruthlessly dismantled Harlequins in their own semi.Leading well: Dylan Hartley rose to the occasion at the Allianz  With odds longer than a dinner with your in-laws, Saints are not fancied to triumph, particularly as they face a side who turn up to Twickenham for a grand final for the ninth season in a row. They have only won three times in their last eight visits, of course, but they know the occasion well. When the pressure is on, it is also assumed, Saints players may cast their minds back to their last major final in 2011 when the team threw away a sizeable 22-6 half-time lead over Leinster in the Heineken Cup to lose 33-22.What Saints showed in this year’s semi, however, is that they can face the over-hyped foe, suffer some slugs in a few rounds of rope-a-dope action and counter. They were most dangerous when slipping round the edges and they took Saracens’ best shots and smiled back at them. LEICESTER, ENGLAND – MAY 11: Mathew Tait of Leicester breaks with the ball during the Aviva Premiership semi final match between Leicester Tigers and Harlequins at Welford Road on May 11, 2013 in Leicester, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) Dazzling drive: As Leicester led, Matt Tait shone in the semisSlow slogging plays in to Leicester’s hands because as soon as Saints get used to a monotonous pace the Tigers can punch through the midfield with Manu Tuilagi and Vereniki Goneva. They can cover kicks cleverly, too, with Mathew Tait and Toby Flood in good form. The pack can do as they have traditionally done at Twickenham, bundling forward and sucking fight out of the opposition, if Leicester’s thinkers know where the ball is going.This is what happened the last time the two sides met in March, with Tigers blowing Saints away with a 38-6 win. Even while wasting chances Leicester were able to take the best of Northampton, hold them down and let Flood kick before Tuilagi exploded through the barricades in the second half, leading Tigers towards a comprehensive victory. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS In versatile forward Samu Manoa they have an athlete who lands on other players like a house-brick frisbee and their front row are one of the best on the planet. They will want to manouvre themselves smartly around the park thanks to the boots of Stephen Myler and Ben Fodden, but it is how their pack spar with the Tigers’ heavies that will dictate the pace of this game. Saints have to recreate the form of their semi final, not that lumbering slow-dance of a regular season match-up.At 3pm at Twickenham the hardiest of fans will witness more crunching action. The players may not wince as the crowd do, but they should all be prepared: this will not be an ambush so much as an old-fashioned tear up.last_img read more

New Zealand 28-27 England: A thriller from the game’s elite

first_img TAGS: Highlight Three tries each, some scintillating play, controversial TMO calls, a late fight back and a home town hero lighting it up from full-back: this Test had it all, writes Alan Dymock in Dunedin. This series is now officially New Zealand’s, but as All Blacks head coach Steve Hansen said: “There’s been nothing in it.”Nothing in it: There have been flashes of brilliance, but there have been no huge winsA one-point loss will be tough to take, but this side had to concede to the quality of their hosts and as England head-coach said after the match, his team deserved a half-time lead and did well to come back in the fourth quarter of the game, but the third section was were the All Blacks really showed their quality.There was frustration there and plenty of positives, from an English point of view, but in the end it was a performance of champions from New Zealand in the face of staunchly challenging opposition still learning lessons abroad.England captain Chris Robshaw probably summed it up perfectly when he said there was “no secret recipe” to the All Black’s quality. It’s just that they are “probably the most dangerous side in the world” when you switch off. But it’s not over. Not by a long shot. When Richie McCaw said his full-back Ben Smith was “a champion” post-match, just after beating England 28-27 in the second Test in Dunedin, he held a big grin.The full-back was the pick of the players on the day – a day for running rugby under the roof at Forsyth Barr – but in the second half a three-try blitz from local hero Smith, Julian Savea and Ma’a Nonu was enough to see the All Blacks clear, despite an impressively strong first 40 minutes from England. This Test was one of the most thrilling encounters you could hope to witness and one which ensures there is a strong rivalry between the two nations, stretching into 2015.The first half fizzed with England galloping into a 10-6 half-time lead, a step and hanging pop finding Marland Yarde who glided through a McCaw tackle to score the only try of the first half. It felt as if there could be an upset on the cards and a when a Manu Tuilagi 60m break was reeled in by Ben Smith there was a sense that the world champions were holding on by their fingertips.Scuttling off the wing: Manu Tuilagi had mixed fortunes playing at 14 for EnglandHowever, the All Blacks never seem to get rattled and while England huddled on the halfway line just after the break while their counterparts in black came out scowling, not talking at all, ready for business.Smith was very quickly put through under the posts after a two-on-one was created by Savea, who enjoyed a busy game opposite Tuilagi. The menacing winger was a particular threat zeroing in on the hole between England’s centres and he also scored one himself, taking his total to 20 tries in 21 Tests. Then, when Nonu managed to step inside Yarde’s and Luther Burrell’s tackles after a sensational half-break from Conrad Smith, scoring a Kiwi third, the mood changed again.This England side will, of course never roll over, and while Mike Brown scored a controversial try that looked for all the world like it was not grounded in the TV replays, England got into the right areas at the death. And there was nothing controversial about the last score, with Brown expertly collecting an out-the-back-door offload from Tuilagi – looking all the more comfortable at centre than he did at wing – and he put away Chris Ashton, who could only give a mini-splash to score. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Local hero: Ben Smith is congratulated by Julian Savea after a superb showing in front of his home fans “We came down here to win a series and we haven’t done that,” Robshaw agreed before defiantly saying: “We still want to win a game down here.”This match was a show from the elite level of rugby. Let’s all hope it carries on in the same entertaining manner for the third Test in Hamilton, as well as in the now-important mid-weeker against the Canterbury Crusaders.last_img read more

Five talking points from the last month in rugby

first_img Burgess – one bad decision led to dozens moreA single decision dictated the entire outcome of Sam Burgess’ career in union – was he a back or a forward? In hindsight the flip of a coin may have resulted in a better outcome for Burgess, Bath and England. The inability to make that decision has led to a Chernobyl-like fallout in English rugby, with coaches, pundits and players developing nervous ticks at the mere mention of Burgess. The reality is that if Sam Burgess was deemed a backrow forward, a six in all likelihood, then he wouldn’t have gone to the Rugby World Cup. Burgess simply wouldn’t have developed the required knowledge of the breakdown, in just five-odd games there, to oust England’s first choice backrow forwards.Collateral damage: Sam Burgess’ ill-fated year in union could have severe ramificationsHowever, the decision to turn him into a centre is where the blame really rests. Without the backing of Bath, Burgess couldn’t have become an international centre whilst he was playing at six for his club. It meant that not only did Burgess have to cope with switching from league to union but had to deal with the quantum differences of playing inside-centre and blindside flanker; in two calamitous five month chunks. Besides lobbing his dumbbells out of the pram and returning prematurely to the NRL, Burgess is largely blameless. However, those in key decision making roles have helped damage multiple careers and the finger pointing will undoubtedly turn into ‘two finger’ pointing when the RFU release its Rugby World Cup review.Size is no longer enoughAs all Rugby World Cups do, the 2015 incarnation tweaked what is required from a test team. Being big is no longer enough. Unlike the previous two World Cups which rewarded massive packs, the ability to secure penalties from set piece, and a 90%+ kicking percentage, 2015 was different. Wonderfully different. The successful teams weren’t ‘gym gorillas’ – the term ‘gym monkeys’ no longer being appropriate given the size of the modern test player. Size is still important, but it is no longer the be all and end all. The ability to move the ball through the 12 and 13 channel has once again become key to winning games.Ahead of the game: The All Blacks have the requisite power allied to the key core skillsThere was a point in test rugby, five years ago, where wings didn’t score tries and merely chased box kicks like greyhounds running after a furry rugby ball with long ears. But that is no longer the case. This year’s stand out teams and individual performances occurred in squads which were able to efficiently move the ball through the central channels – Japan being a fine example. It is also no coincidence that the All Blacks dominated the World Cup when their forwards are able to handle the ball better than many elite clubs backlines. Put simply, test players need to handle more ball and spend less time pumping tin.Finally signs of optimism for the Welsh regionsAt first glance this premise looks absurd, unless you’re a Scarlets supporter, who have had a magnificent start to the season. But whilst the table makes eye gouging reading for Cardiff Blues, Newport Gwent Dragons and the Ospreys, behind the scenes ‘Kasparov’ type moves are being made that could significantly benefit Welsh rugby over the next five years. Although unconfirmed, the Welsh region’s salary cap looks set to increase by a million per region. Doing some maths, you’d think the reported £33m windfall from Under Armour after they signed a nine-year contract and reported £10m windfall from the Rugby World Cup has helped make these decisions.Signing up: The WRU have now ammassed 16 players on National Dual ContractsAs a result, the WRU’s National Dual Contact (NDC) pot may also increase significantly. This follows in the wake of NDCs being signed by Dan Baker, Rory Thornton, James King and Scott Baldwin. There are also suggestions that George North, Leigh Halfpenny and Jon Davies are firmly in the sights of the WRU and Regions. The details are of course yet to be confirmed, but the syphilitic state of Welsh rugby’s finances appears to have finally been given a shot of penicillin that it desperately needs. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS We need more exposure to referees, not less Rugby’s perceived wisdom is that the more anonymous a referee is on the field, the better they have performed. Off the field, referees are also often criticised for having excessive exposure in the media. It seems as though most rugby supporters would be happy for World Rugby to develop a refereeing automaton, jam a whistle in its rubbery mouth and be done with their human counterpart. But the reality is that quite the opposite needs to happen. It’s the only way to resolve the miscommunication that regularly occurs between referee, player and supporter. Like it or not, due to rugby’s unique – and often complex – system of laws every single game is refereed differently.Ongoing dialogue: Referees should be heard to increase supporters understanding of the gameThat’s why the public and media need to have a dialogue with referees to understand exactly what his happening on the pitch. A perfect example being the ‘crooked feed’ at the scrum. Twelve months ago we were told that it would be whistled heavily, to eradicate it from the game. But that clearly is no longer the case and yet no one has told us officially. Interviewing a referee before the game, to understand exactly what he is looking for from the players would be hugely beneficial for the rugby watching public. The players have the opportunity to discuss the game with the referee in the changing rooms, prior to kick off, so why shouldn’t we?Salary Cap breaches affect everyoneLast month saw the Aviva Premiership teams engage in a brawl, where the weapon of choice was a press release. The upshot was a significant number of clubs stating that they weren’t one of those investigated for salary cap breaches. Whether or not certain clubs decided to flaunt the rules and upgrade their cap to a shiny new crown, may seem like a rather trivial point; but it isn’t. The ramifications of clubs tweaking a salary cap are far reaching and affect the game as a whole, not just England’s elite club competition.Cap doesn’t fit: The salary cap palaver hasn’t reached a satisfactory conclusionSalary caps are not only a means of creating parity of finances, they also stop the hyperinflation of players’ wages. The hyperinflation of players wages could affect both the Aviva Premiership and the Pro 12; which left unchecked could result in the spectacular wage increases that English football’s Premier League experienced in the late 1990s. The worst case scenario is that salary cap breaches inflate the market to the point that the gap in revenue is passed on to supporters via ticket prices. Rugby needs to avoid this situation at all costs and if salary cap cheats need to be outed, then so be it.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. Sam Burgess, the salary cap, good news at the Welsh regions and how size is no longer enough in Test rugby are all discussed Seismic shift: Strength is no longer enough at the elite level, more nuances skills are required last_img read more

WATCH: Sexton Drop-Goal Used To Promote Irish Tourism

first_imgFootage of the winning drop-kick against France has been used in a video for Irish tourism. Ireland close out the Six Nations with a… Expand Additionally, a women’s sevens player scores a try by stretching over the line with a Fijian defender trailing in her wake.The video celebrates everything that is Ireland, and they could have more to celebrate come Saturday afternoon too.In the final round of the tournament, Ireland play England at Twickenham with a victory meaning a Grand Slam, their first since 2009.Related: England v Ireland previewThey have already won the 2018 Six Nations differentiating themselves as the best team in the competition by some margin.England on the other hand have been struggling after losses to Scotland and France in consecutive weeks.As if the stakes were not high enough, Grand Slams are rare achievements, the match is at the legendary Twickenham stadium and it all takes place on St Patrick’s Day… What Is A Grand Slam? Ireland Six Nations Squad 2021 What Is A Grand Slam? Who do you think is going to win this weekend? England’s Six Nations ends with defeat in Dublin Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook and Twitter. WATCH: Sexton Drop-Goal Used To Promote Irish TourismDuring the first weekend of the 2018 Six Nations, Ireland faced a spirited French team that looked set to win a famous victory over the the men in green.However, a cross-kick and countless phases later, Johnny Sexton produced one of the stand-out moments in Irish and Six Nations history, with a drop-kick from just inside the halfway line.The rugby world looked on in awe as it just crept over the bar to seal three points and snatch victory from the jaws of a defeat at the hands of the French.It was a monstrous moment in every way, locking in the legend of Sexton.And now it appears the moment has been used by the Irish Tourist Board to try and promote visits to the island.Sport plays a signifiant part in Irish culture as shown by the inclusion of Sexton’s drop-kick, along with other images of rugby.Also featured is an emotional John Hayes, the former Ireland and Munster, pictured crying as the anthem is played before a Test match. Watch: Sexton’s drop-goal appears in tourism video (Getty Images) Collapse England Six Nations Squad 2021 Expand Ireland Six Nations Squad 2021 England Six Nations Squad 2021 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The greatest honour a team can achieve in…last_img read more

New Zealand’s Christchurch Cathedral, waiting to be reborn

first_img Tags Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Anglican Communion Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books New Zealand’s Christchurch Cathedral, waiting to be reborn This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN By Lori EricksonPosted Dec 15, 2011 Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Rector Washington, DC center_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ [Episcopal News Service] On a recent trip to New Zealand, I was saddened to learn that I wouldn’t be able to see Christchurch Cathedral, the symbolic heart of the City of Christchurch and the home parish for hundreds of Anglicans. Earlier this year I had followed the news accounts of the series of earthquakes that had damaged Christchurch, but until I visited in person I didn’t realize the extent of the damage.Months after the quakes, the center of Christchurch is still a tangled mess of collapsed and damaged buildings, including the stately Gothic-style cathedral that had graced its downtown since 1881. Even worse, while I was in New Zealand it was announced that the church is so damaged that it cannot be repaired.In talking to residents and reading the New Zealand newspapers, I was struck by how beloved Christchurch Cathedral is, even for those who are not Anglican. In a letter to the editor of one of the national newspapers, for example, a woman wrote of how the church needed to be rebuilt as a sign of hope for the entire country. She recalled how the Germans had rebuilt the Frauenkirche of Dresden, a church that had been reduced to rubble in the firebombing raids of World War II. Thanks to a fundraising campaign that brought in money from around the world, the damaged structure was laboriously rebuilt, brick by brick. It reopened in 2005 before a joyous crowd of 250,000 people, a symbol of a reunified Germany and the healing of wounds between nations once at war.New Zealand’s Christchurch Cathedral was severely damaged in an earthquake on February 22, 2011. Photo/Christchurch CathedralIt’s interesting how churches can have such symbolic importance, even in our post-modern age. The medieval model in which the cathedral was the heart of a city has long withered, but sometimes a disaster like that in Christchurch reveals that churches still have a presence greater than their physical structure. These buildings stand with quiet dignity, havens of calm and peace in the midst of the bustle of contemporary life. While most passersby rarely step foot inside their doors, such sanctuaries nevertheless exude a quiet power. And if such landmarks are destroyed, there remains a gaping hole that cannot be filled by just another building made of steel or concrete.New Zealand’s Christchurch Cathedral was deconsecrated on Nov. 9 in a service that prepared the way for demolition crews to take down its damaged walls. Cathedral officials say that the church will be rebuilt, though the new structure will not simply be a reconstruction of what existed before. Instead it will combine old and new elements to reflect a re-born Christchurch and a revitalized parish, blending design elements of white New Zealand and Maori New Zealand just as the New Zealand Prayer Book so beautifully blends elements from the two cultures.I have stood in awe before the rebuilt Frauenkirche in Dresden, marveling at how its walls incorporate aged, darkened bricks and newer, paler ones in a seamless intertwining of past and present. On top of the church is a golden cross given by the people of Great Britain and crafted by the son of one of the pilots who bombed Dresden in 1945. It bears this message: “Build bridges—Live Reconciliation—Bolster Belief.”Christchurch Cathedral was destroyed not by human agency, but by geologic forces. But like the Frauenkirche, its rebirth has global significance, particularly for those of us who are members of the Anglican Communion.“With the bread we need for today, feed us,” reads a version of the Lord’s Prayer from that volume. “In the hurts we absorb from one another, forgive us. In times of temptation and testing, strengthen us. From trials too great to endure, spare us.”One day, we pray, these words will once again be said in Christchurch Cathedral.Lori Erickson writes about inner and outer journeys at http://www.spiritualtravels.info/.  She serves as a deacon at Trinity Episcopal Church in Iowa City, Iowa. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

Rest in Peace: ‘Laptop,’ resident Canterbury Cathedral cat

first_img Featured Events Posted Sep 20, 2013 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group October 8, 2013 at 9:03 am To feel needed and loved; get a cat. Thank-you Laptop and every cat I have ever had, what wonderful friends, God’s Blessings to you all Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 September 22, 2013 at 2:31 pm A sweet, sweet spirit in that place has been sadly lost. [Canterbury Cathedral press release] We are sad to report the death of Laptop, the Cathedral cat. The friendly feline had lived at the Cathedral for many years and it was estimated that he was over 18 years old.Laptop was a free spirit and the exact story of how he came to live at the Cathedral is somewhat of a mystery. It is believed he started his life here visiting the choir boys at Choir House, and this is how we think he got his name, as he was forever trying to jump on people’s lap when they stroked him.Several years ago, the choral boarding house was renovated and Laptop decided to make the Cloisters his home, and this is where he happily stayed.The Cathedral cleaners cared for him and made sure he was well fed and looked after. He would happily greet and walk with the vergers every morning as they opened up the Cloisters and his routine was always to mew at the Martyrdom door just before Matins so he could go in and attend the service; he even had his own chair. He would while away many a sunny afternoon stretched out in the Water Tower garden and so it seemed only appropriate that we laid him to rest in one of his favorite spots.He was a friendly and content cat, adored by the staff and volunteers at the Cathedral. He has welcomed millions of visitors — and probably appeared in thousands of photographs — to the Cloisters over the years. Since his death, we have been amazed at the number of visitors and volunteers who have contacted us to share their fond memories of the Cloister resident.A selection of Laptop photos is here. Donald Lowery says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Comments (4) Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rest in Peace: ‘Laptop,’ resident Canterbury Cathedral catcenter_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Jay Woods says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Carol Turner says: Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service September 20, 2013 at 6:10 pm All things bright and beautiful,All creatures great and small,All things wise and wonderful,The Lord God made them all. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA October 2, 2013 at 6:28 am There is nothing more loving than a cat laying on your lap. He lived a good life. Rector Tampa, FL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Anglican Communion Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS John R Huff Jr. says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more

Diocese of Bethlehem issues call for election of next bishop

first_img Bishop Elections, Submit a Job Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tags [Episcopal Diocese of Bethlehem] Diocese of Bethlehem Bishop Provisional Sean Rowe said Jan. 5 that the diocese is ready to begin the process of electing its ninth bishop diocesan.His letter follows.January 5, 2017Dear Sisters and Brothers in Christ:When you gave me the honor of serving as your bishop provisional in March 2014, I pledged to spend several years working with you to discern the Diocese of Bethlehem’s common mission and update and streamline financial, governance and administrative practices. With thanksgiving for your remarkable progress in assuring a faithful future for the diocese, today I am calling for the election of the ninth bishop of Bethlehem.In consultation with the Rt. Rev. Clay Matthews, the Episcopal Church’s bishop for pastoral development, and Judy Stark, a consultant recommended by his office who is a daughter of the Diocese of Bethlehem, the Standing Committee will soon seek members for a search committee to discern a slate of nominees for bishop. In time, the Standing Committee will also name a transitions committee to oversee the new bishop’s consecration and welcome to the diocese. Although the final calendar for the search process will be determined by the Standing Committee, I anticipate that we will elect the ninth bishop of Bethlehem in the spring of 2018 and consecrate and seat that person in the fall of that year.During my remaining time as your bishop provisional, I look forward to fostering the shared values and relationships that emerged from our recent diocesan pilgrimage and continuing to work with you on developing a mission strategy to unite our response to God’s call. You will receive further updates about the search for your next bishop from the Standing Committee and, once it is named, from the search committee.I continue to be grateful for this opportunity to serve with you for a time, and I ask you to join me in praying for the leaders in the Diocese of Bethlehem who will participate the search for your next bishop.Faithfully,The Rt. Rev. Sean RoweBishop Provisional Rector Shreveport, LA Posted Jan 6, 2017 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Featured Events Rector Washington, DC House of Bishops Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Diocese of Bethlehem issues call for election of next bishopcenter_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more

Presiding Bishop reflects on Holy Land as pilgrimage nears its…

first_imgPresiding Bishop reflects on Holy Land as pilgrimage nears its end Posted Mar 29, 2018 Featured Events Marian Conrad says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel March 31, 2018 at 4:31 pm What a blessing to follow Presiding Bishop’s reflections this Holy Week, thanks for his spiritual leadership Holy Week/Easter, Presiding Bishop 2018 Holy Land pilgrimage, Middle East, Israel-Palestine, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Presiding Bishop Michael Curry preaches in the chapel of Al Ahli Arab Hospital in Gaza City on March 26. Jerusalem Archbishop Suheil Dawani is seated behind him. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Jerusalem] On Maundy Thursday afternoon, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry reflected on what he has seen and heard since arriving in the Holy Land March 23 to make a Holy Week pilgrimage.In the week that we’ve been here, we have spent time, and some of it in depth, with Archbishop Suheil and our Anglican brothers and sisters. In the course of our time we have seen and visited holy places where our Lord Jesus was born in Bethlehem, raised in Nazareth, spoke Beatitudes on the hills of Galilee and then entered Jerusalem in a procession that proclaimed that God has a better way for humanity than the way of power politics and greed and hatred.And we have walked the streets of Jerusalem where Jesus was unjustly arrested, tortured and killed – the streets where he willingly sacrificed his life for the cause of God’s love, which ultimately is the only hope for us all.As we have seen the places of his suffering, we have seen the suffering of the children of God today.We heard the cries of Christian refugees from Iraq, people who have lost virtually everything save their own lives, mainly because they are followers of Jesus.We have heard the cries of people in Gaza, where the church here provides an oasis in a hospital, and oasis in the midst of a war zone through a hospital built on the teachings and spirit of Jesus, where healing and care is made available to all regardless of religion, regardless of ethnicity, regardless of politics.We have heard the cries of Palestinian Christians throughout the land, who thrive only for equal treatment and kindness and justice for all regardless of race or religion.We have heard the cries of people in Palestine in the West Bank where the Diocese of Jerusalem is present in St. Luke’s Hospital and its clinic and its churches. Following the teachings of Jesus again, no one is turned away because of inability to pay or because of religion or politics or ethnicity.We have heard the cries of the Palestinian people in Jerusalem who yearn as all people yearn to breathe free in true human equality.We have heard the cries of Israeli youths whose longings are the same, to breathe free, safe and secure.We will visit Yad Vashem, where the end result of hatred and bigotry and inequality and injustice is there for all to see. Jesus sacrificed his life to save us from the sins and arrogance and indifference and injustice, bigotry, hatred; he came to show us the way, to be saved from the human nightmare.As we pray for the peace of Jerusalem, as the Bible teaches us, we must find ways to work for the peace of Jerusalem, which will be found where there is true equality for all, true justice for all and true freedom for everyone. Here it is clear that this is not simply an idealistic dream. It is the only hope, and we must not rest until it is realized. David Benedict says: Comments (4) Angustia Hamasaki says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC March 29, 2018 at 4:33 pm Thanks much to Bishop Curry for his telling remarks while in the Holy City. I made a pilgrimmage to the Tent of Nations southwest of Bethlehem in May 2016 and learned that all the followers of Christ in the Holy Land need to speak with one voice to the desperate needs of the Palestinian people, and to stand with them for justice and peace in the continuing times of violence and hatred. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 March 31, 2018 at 5:10 am Thank you Presiding Bishop Michael, for carrying the cross. Hoping and praying that brings healing to the Palestinian and for all that needs healing that we may focus on God’s Love always in us all be manifested. Through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest center_img Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Maxanna Demko says: Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC Ecumenical & Interreligious, Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN April 6, 2018 at 8:23 am Thank you, Bishop Curry, for your inspiring and faith-filled messages to us. You are truly God’s gift to the Christian World as I told you at our Diocesan 200th Convention Celebration. In Christ,Maxanna Comments are closed. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA last_img read more

Season of Intentional Discipleship sparks growing worldwide movement

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Anglican Communion This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group [Anglican Communion News Service] Anglicans around the world are joining in a movement of discipleship, equipping each other to spread the power of the Gospel. The coordinating group for the Season of Intentional Discipleship is meeting this week in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia amid growing excitement. As they gather, a film highlighting the Season of Intentional Discipleship has been released. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Posted Apr 24, 2018 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY Season of Intentional Discipleship sparks growing worldwide movement Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GAlast_img read more